Libertarian Prepper

The world divides politically into those who want people to be controlled, and those who have no such desire.

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Black Lives Matter doesn’t seem to care about the black slave trade in Libya

Ever since the fall of Gaddafi, Libya has become an increasingly chaotic basket case. One of the most dramatic consequences of this is that slavery is back. This isn’t the covert human trafficking that happens in secret. This is completely in the open.

Open air markets where people can buy a black African slave for as little as $400.

Slavery isn’t a past crime, relegated to a shameful history recounted in classroom lectures. It’s happening right now. Not just in Libya, but throughout Ghana, Benin, Togo, Nigeria, and other countries.

Yet the Black Lives Matter movement has yet to denounce this. Since finding out about the open air slavery in Libya a few weeks ago, I’ve been on the lookout for articles that talk about this. Surely, this is a serious issue that needs attention?

I think the fundamental reason is that talking about how black lives matter in America requires no courage and involves little to no risk. America is a free-ish society with pretty decent freedom of speech. Plus, it’s easy to criticize white people because a lot of them feel guilt, even if they haven’t done anything wrong, and the moment they argue they’ll just be labeled a racist and dismissed.

But going to Libya or these other countries in Africa and trying to actually free the black slaves? Fighting back against real life, present-day slave traders? Well, that requires courage. Real courage. And there’s certainly no profit in it. Plus, it doesn’t really fit the narrative, after all, the slavers aren’t white people. And even though white people have made a smaller contribution to slavery throughout history than muslims, and for a far shorter period of time, the modern narrative is “blame the white guy”.

If the Black Lives Matter movement really wants to help black people, why don’t they go and do something about the slaves in Africa? Or at least just mention them? It’s like the difference between a feminist speaker preaching to the choir at a liberal college campus in America, versus doing something about the way women are treated in Saudi Arabia. One’s easy, the other one isn’t. But it just so happens that the harder one is the one that actually matters.